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Verde Resilient Communities

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Verde Resilient Communities

We are a network of communities, organizations and individuals in Northern Arizona working together to improve the quality of life by moving to a value-based economy.

Website: http://www.verdeans.org
Group Type: Transition Initiatives
Members: 17
Latest Activity: Sep 22, 2011

TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES PORTFOLIO

"Kickstart" template to assist in building VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES/TRANSITION.
Use Comment Wall below to volunteer to help build this relationship.

INTRODUCTION TO TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES
  • Official TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES Website
  • Contact for further information - jneville@sustainablearizona.org
  • Mission Statement
  • Blogs
  • Links to TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES officers and initiators
  • Links to TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES events
  • Geographical Location

PRIMARY AREAS OF INTEREST AT VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES
  • Resource Sharing
  • Community Building
  • Neighbor Networking
  • Building & Supporting Local Economies & Local Curency
  • Time Bank Network
  • Local Food Production
  • Reduced Energy Use?
  • Weaning Off Fossil Fuel Dependence
  • Conserving Water Resources

TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES RELATIONSHIP TO TRANSITION MOVEMENT
  • Supports the Transition Movement in several ways...
  • Seeks to deepen the relationship by...

TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES ON THE INTERNET
  • Newcomers to Transition
  • Independent groups related to TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES.
  • More pertinent resources, partners, opportunities to engage.

TRANSITION VERDE RESILIENT COMMUNITIES CHALLENGES AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
  • Current Needs involving Transition Social Network
  • Current Offers to the Transition Social Network

Discussion Forum

August News from Gardens for Humanity

Started by Richard V. Sidy. Last reply by John F Neville Aug 22, 2010. 1 Reply

Below is a link to our July-August newsletter. It spotlights our "IdeaGardens" Tour and our work to develop school gardens throughout theVerde Valley.…Continue

Tags: Plants, Harvesting, Rainwater, School, Native

Selling Agriculture 2.0 to Silicon Valley

Started by John F Neville. Last reply by Sarah Irani Jun 7, 2010. 1 Reply

Let me know what you think of this development. If these investors support local agriculture on small farms, that's great. If they are going to push production to gain high tech-style profits, that's…Continue

Communities of the Future

Started by John F Neville Jun 4, 2010. 0 Replies

Here's a kindred initiative: http://communitiesofthefuture.org/ They have some work on community engagement. I'll check it out. If any of you know…Continue

Making Contacts & Carrying the Message

Started by John F Neville. Last reply by Sarah Irani May 29, 2010. 3 Replies

We were at a nice party over the weekend - a birthday celebration that included a number of people we'd never met before. During the food and festivities, some of us began talking about the "Good Old…Continue

Tags: fun, food, contacts, networking, transitions

World-wide exemplars and how-to's we can all learn from...

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Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Verde Resilient Communities to add comments!

Comment by Valencia Bathe on June 27, 2010 at 7:23pm
Harry - I can't find Verde Valley Food Growers on Facebook; please send the link. Thank you.
Comment by Harry Sweet on June 27, 2010 at 4:20pm
Verde Valley Food Growers now on Facebook! If you grow or want local produce please join us.
Comment by John F Neville on June 12, 2010 at 3:47pm
We're traveling cross-country. Now in rainy Minnesota enjoying friends. Everyone I speak with thinks our resilient communities idea is great. Lots of good thoughts. More when we land.
Comment by William Eaton on June 7, 2010 at 12:40pm
Just checking in to see if I'm on the network. Would this be the Verde Valley Resilient Community 'wall.'? State of Arizona? William
Comment by Valencia Bathe on June 1, 2010 at 2:55pm
See now, THIS is the kind of meeting I want to attend!
Comment by John F Neville on May 31, 2010 at 3:27pm
Visit http://transitionus.ning.com/profiles/blogs/global-transition-in-ac... on this site - information from the rest of the world.
Comment by jane moore on May 29, 2010 at 1:11am
Yes, i have been to a presentation by Brad, and also have his book. In my case, i live on a very steep slope and have carved paths for water out to flat terraces, but soil is thin over bedrock, so i really need to catch more in containers for gardening. Am doing most plants in containers this year. Also looking for good deals on bulk native pasture grasses... haven't had much luck with expensive native seeds i've tried in the past.
Comment by Sarah Irani on May 28, 2010 at 10:50pm
There are some ideas for harvesting rainwater that don't require tanks. Well, you wouldn't actually be "harvesting" it, you would be "planting" it. Meaning, there are ways to divert and slow the water so that it flows where you want and need it (your garden and orchard), and then slow it down (by contouring the earth in certain ways) so it sinks right in, absorbed into the soil instead of rushing along quickly and causing erosion.

I always thought rainwater catchment was only about containers, but after listening to this great podcast interview with Brad Lancaster, I was quickly educated on the subject! Here's the link: http://www.futureprimitive.org/2010/04/harvesting-rainwater/

And his website is: http://www.harvestingrainwater.com/

Great stuff! A lot can be done with observation and a shovel!
Comment by Harry Sweet on May 28, 2010 at 1:47pm
I agree that containers are pricey. Nice ones at HD for $100, 45 gal. I have some used 30 gal water heaters and storage tanks but have to put up gutters first. For now just 5 gal buckets catch water (****stick inside buckets for animals to escape!****).
Ideally I would like a 200-500gal tank and a pump.
For now I just have catch basins (no $, just a lot of labor) which work very well and little to no water leaves the property except during the really large downpours.
It is NOT OK to cover prime ag land with houses!
Comment by jane moore on May 28, 2010 at 9:09am
I have been an advocate for sustainable, local AG while on the Yavapai County Water Advisory Committee for the last 10 years, which has always been a minority opinion, only 2 0r 3 of us out of 15 members. The prevailing opinion is that AG lands will be converted to housing, water rights sold to cities for development, food coming from elsewhere (South America for instance), that it is foolish to use water in the desert for growing food. I believe the figure in AZ is around 70% of water is used for AG. Most is flood irrigation in southern AZ, from Phoenix and south, with CAP water. Converting flood irrigation to drip irrigation can help a lot, as far as conserving water, but i think it is a dangerous proposition to convert AG water rights to water for more development. (just my opinion for further discussion!)
Have been discussing water conservation as it relates to gardening with many people lately, and many are interested in rainwater harvesting, but can't afford to buy or build water tanks.
 

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